Administration

1941

Looking southwest from the air, the Student Union, Administration, Agricultural Sciences, Vet Medicine, Glover, and Civil Engineering (now Statistics) buildings.

2019

The addition of Clark, Computer Science, Wagar, and Weber buildings, Johnson Hall, Lory Student Center, the Great Green and Intramural Fields (upper right) filled out campus. Green spaces were preserved in quads, plazas, and practice fields to keep with the University’s land-grant mission.

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The Lagoon

1964

The Lagoon was constructed on the west lawn of the Lory Student Center in 1963 and landscaped in 1964 to be a restful open area. The Vietnam Era Memorial Bridge spans Arthur Ditch, to the south in the foreground. Bricks from Old Main, built in 1870 and destroyed in a fire in 1970, were used in the construction of the bridge.

2019

Now obscured by mature trees, the Lagoon is surrounded by a many-times renovated Lory Student Center, Lory Student Center Theatre, and Morgan Library. The Lagoon stills serves as a quiet respite space, while the adjacent lawns host the Lagoon Summer Concert Series, Homecoming, and game day celebrations.

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Lory Student Center

1981

The Lory Student Center Plaza as seen from the top of the Clark building, looking northwest. The Lory Student Center was built in 1962 and at different times contained a bowling alley and ice rink.

2019

The Lory Student Center has undergone many changes, including renovating 160,000 square feet and adding 40,000 new square feet as the building reached the 50-year mark in 2012. The main stairs tile mural has stayed the same.

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Moby Arena

Mid-1960s

Built in 1966, Moby Arena could seat 8,746 basketball or volleyball fans. Over the years, it has also been the setting for the 1976 movie One on One, concerts by Big Head Todd and the Monsters, the Steve Miller Band and The Fray, and too many commencement ceremonies to count.

2019

After the 2000-01 season, Moby Arena underwent a renovation to install a 23,000 square feet hardwood floor. The Thurman “Fum” McGraw Athletic Center was added to the Moby Arena complex, as well as expanded ticket boxes and the Colorado State Sports Hall of Fame on the south concourse.

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Veteran’s Village

1955

Green Hall and Veteran’s Village looking northwest. Colorado A&M campus housed about 200 quonset huts sent in 1946 to house soldiers returning from WWII who were enrolled at CSU on the G.I. Bill. Many of the huts from Veteran’s Village were later sold to area farmers and businesses.

2019

Looking northwest, Parmelee, Corbett, Durward, and Westfall Halls, The Durrell Dining Center, and Laurel Village. Green Hall was built as a dormitory in 1954, but later renovated to house Parking Services, then Police Services. The residential wings were razed and developed into parking lots and the Suzanne and Walter Scott, Jr. Bioengineering Building.

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Academic Spine

1964

Charles A. Lory Student Center plaza as taken from the roof of the Engineering building, looking south to the Morgan Library. Initiated by the campus master plan in the 1970s, planners developed campus to be more pedestrian-oriented with plazas, green spaces, and views toward the foothills.

2019

The Lory Student Center plaza is adjacent to the Center Avenue Mall (the Academic Spine) which runs from the Engineering building south to Lake Street. Expansion and growth is evident with multiple additions to the LSC, Morgan Library, Clark Building, Yates Hall (built over the Spine), and Canvas Stadium.

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Statistics

Undated (1910s)

Looking west from atop a smokestack, the Civil and Irrigation Engineering Building was the only building on the west side of Oval Drive. This building has also been the home of Business and Economics, Economics, the Computing Center, and Statistics (today). The iconic Aggie “A” wasn’t painted until 1923; Horsetooth Reservoir dams weren’t built until 1949.

2019

CSU, as well as Fort Collins, has expanded greatly toward the west since the Oval was created in 1910 as a template for future campus buildings. Although there are no longer sheep grazing, Oval Drive and the American elm trees planted between 1922 and 1924 still remain.

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The Towers

1975

As seen from the Corner of Laurel Street and College Avenue, the Towers Complex (Westfall and Durward Halls) and Durrell Center were completed in 1968. Durrell served 3.2 percent beer until the drinking age was raised to 21 in 1987. Moby Arena opened in 1966 for its first ever basketball game.

2019  

The Towers Complex was joined by Laurel Village in 2014 in the former site of the Lory Apartments. Laurel Village offers mentoring and collaborative learning “communities.” The Pavillion, a multi-use event building, was the first on the main campus to achieve LEED Platinum certification.

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University Center for the Arts

1940

Built in 1924 on Remington and Lake Streets, Fort Collins High School was the only high school in Fort Collins until the 1960s. When the school reached its peak enrollment in 1995, a new campus was built at Timberline and Horsetooth Roads. In 1994 the building was designated a local historic landmark.

2019  

The University Center for the Arts took on the old Fort Collins High School and expanded, including a 567-seat performing arts venue, practice auditoriums, the Avenir Museum, a printing annex, and multiple museum spaces. To the west across Remington Street are the Annual Flower Trial Gardens, first planted in 2000, which have become a destination for summer visitors.

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